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Schrade Tang Stamp Chart: Decoding The Marks On Schrade Knives?

Schrade knives have been in production since 1904 and are renowned for their quality and craftsmanship. Over the years, Schrade has used a variety of different tang stamps to identify their knives. These tang stamps can provide valuable information about a Schrade knife, such as its model, year of production, and manufacturing origin. This guide will help decode the various tang stamps used on Schrade knives throughout the years, so that you can better understand the history of your knife.

History of schrade knives and tang stamps

Schrade Knives have been a staple of the American outdoorsman since the early 1900s. Founded in 1904 in Walden, New York, Schrade has been producing knives of the highest quality for over a century. During this time, the company developed a series of unique tang stamps to help identify and date its knives. These tang stamps, located on the blade of the knife, provide a wealth of information about the knife, including the time period in which it was produced, its country of origin, and the type of steel used.

In order to properly identify and date a Schrade knife, one must first understand the tang stamps. The earliest tang stamps, used in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, were simple and often only contained a single letter. As the company grew and expanded, more complex tang stamps were created, with multiple letters and numbers. This system of tang stamps was used until 1960, when Schrade changed to a more modern stamping system.

In addition to the tang stamps, the company also used various other marks to help identify its knives. These included maker’s marks, which identified the name of the individual or company that made the knife, as well as date codes, which indicated the year in which the knife was produced. This information is invaluable to collectors, allowing them to accurately date their knives and determine their relative rarity.

Today, Schrade knives remain a popular and highly sought-after item. With the help of a Schrade tang stamp chart, understanding the marks on these knives is a relatively straightforward process. With this knowledge, collectors can accurately identify and date their knives, as well as identify potential areas of improvement.

Types of schrade tang stamps

Schrade tang stamps are marks found on the tangs of knives made by the Schrade Cutlery Company. These marks can help identify the year and model of the knife as well as provide other information about the knife. There are three main types of Schrade tang stamps: the Walden tang stamp, the Ulster tang stamp, and the Imperial tang stamp.

The Walden tang stamp was used from 1904-1946 and was the longest-running Schrade tang stamp. This stamp typically had the letter “W” followed by a three-digit number. This number represented the model number of the knife and was unique to each type of Schrade knife. The letters “C” and “U” were also included in the Walden tang stamp. The “C” indicated that the knife was made in the USA while the “U” indicated that the knife was made in the UK.

The Ulster tang stamp was used from 1946-1973 and was marked with the letters “U” and “S” followed by a four-digit number. The first two digits in the number indicate the year of production, while the last two digits indicate the model number. For example, a knife marked “U.S. 1584” would indicate that the knife was made in 1951 and the model number was 1584.

The Imperial tang stamp was used from 1973-2004 and was marked with the letters “I” and “X” followed by a four-digit number. The first two digits in the number indicate the year of production, while the last two digits indicate the model number. For example, a knife marked “I.X. 9829” would indicate that the knife was made in 1998 and the model number was 9829.

By studying the different types of Schrade tang stamps, it is possible to accurately identify the year and model of a Schrade knife. This is a great way to determine the age and value of a knife as well as other information about the knife.

How to identify schrade tang stamps

Schrade knives have a long and storied history, with many collectors seeking out the brand for its quality craftsmanship and collectible value. Most Schrade knives have a tang stamp, which is an imprint of the manufacturer’s logo and name, as well as information about the blade’s origin and production date. For avid knife collectors, being able to identify Schrade tang stamps is an important step in verifying the authenticity and value of a knife. In this article, we’ll discuss how to identify Schrade tang stamps and decode the information they provide.

The first step in identifying Schrade tang stamps is to familiarize yourself with the different logos and names that the company has used throughout the years. Schrade has used a variety of logos and names, including Schrade USA, Schrade Walden, Schrade Old Timer, and Schrade Imperial, among others. Familiarizing yourself with these logos and names will help you identify which Schrade tang stamps correspond to which production period.

Once you’ve identified the logo, you can then interpret the rest of the information on the tang stamp. Most Schrade tang stamps will feature a two-letter code, which can be used to identify the year and month of production. The first letter corresponds to the last digit of the year of production, while the second letter corresponds to the month of production. For example, a tang stamp with the code “HJ” would indicate that the knife was produced in July of 1988.

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In addition to the two-letter code, many Schrade tang stamps also feature a three-digit code. This code is typically used to identify the specific model of the knife. For example, a knife with a tang stamp featuring the code “123” would indicate that the knife is a Schrade Old Timer model 123.

Finally, some Schrade tang stamps may feature additional information, such as the country of origin. For example, a tang stamp featuring the name “Japan” would indicate that the knife was produced in Japan.

By familiarizing yourself with the different Schrade tang stamps and the information they provide, you can easily identify the production date and model of a Schrade knife. This can help you determine the authenticity and value of a knife, allowing you to make an informed purchase decision. With a bit of research and knowledge about Schrade tang stamps, you can easily identify and

Common schrade tang stamp abbreviations

Schrade knives have been around since 1904, and they have been used by a variety of people from hunters to collectors. One of the most interesting aspects of Schrade knives is the tang stamp. This stamp can be found on the blade of the knife and it typically has some sort of letters or numbers on it. These tang stamps can tell you a lot about the knife, such as the type of steel used, the year it was made, and even the location where it was made. The most common Schrade tang stamps are abbreviations that have been used since the company’s founding. Understanding these abbreviations can help you determine the age and origin of your knife.

The most common abbreviation found on Schrade tang stamps is “U.S.A.” This abbreviation stands for United States of America and it simply means that the knife is American-made. Other abbreviations can also tell you the year the knife was made. For example, “1952” indicates that the knife was made in 1952, while “1953-54” indicates that the knife was made during some time between 1953 and 1954. Additionally, some Schrade tang stamps will have the letters “K,” “C,” and “P” on them. These abbreviations stand for the type of steel used in the knife, such as “K” for Kraton, “C” for carbon steel, and “P” for stainless steel.

Finally, Schrade tang stamps will sometimes have a code that indicates the location where the knife was made. For example, “QN” stands for the Queen Cutlery Company, which is located in Titusville, Pennsylvania. “KU” stands for the Ka-Bar Cutlery Company, which is located in Olean, New York. Additionally, “KB” stands for the Kinfolks Cutlery Company, which is located in Athens, Georgia.

By understanding the common Schrade tang stamp abbreviations, you can gain a better understanding of your Schrade knife. Knowing the type of steel, year it was made, and location it was made can help you determine the value of your knife and help you make sure it is authentic. Additionally, you can use the information to find out more about the history of Schrade knives and their production.

Age of vintage schrade knives

Schrade knives have been around for a very long time, with some of the oldest models dating back to the early 1900s. Schrade knives are highly sought after by knife collectors and users alike due to their high quality and long-lasting construction. Over the years, Schrade has developed a variety of knife designs, but all feature the same tang stamp which can be used to identify the age and type of knife.

The Schrade tang stamp chart is a useful tool for decoding the marks on Schrade knives. The chart contains information about the different Schrade tang stamps, which indicate the year and type of knife. For example, the “U.S.A.” stamp indicates a Schrade-made knife manufactured between 1916 and 1950, while the “Old Timer” stamp indicates a Schrade-made knife manufactured between 1959 and 2004. The chart also includes information about the different Schrade knife patterns, such as the popular “Old Timer” and “Uncle Henry” lines.

In addition to the Schrade tang stamp chart, there are other methods for identifying vintage Schrade knives. For example, Schrade knives often have a “Tough Guy” stamp on the blade, which indicates a Schrade-made knife manufactured between 1952 and 1959. Collectors can also use the knife’s handle materials, blade length, and blade features to identify the age of a particular Schrade knife.

The Schrade tang stamp chart is a valuable tool for knife collectors and users alike. By reading the chart, collectors can accurately identify the age of their Schrade knives and determine which models are valuable or rare. For knife users, the Schrade tang stamp chart can help them identify the correct knife for their particular needs and ensure that they’re using the highest quality product possible.

Dating old schrade knives

Dating old Schrade knives can be a tricky task, as many of the knives produced by the company over the years have no visibly-stamped date codes or other markings to help in identifying when they were made. In order to accurately identify when a particular Schrade knife was manufactured, it is necessary to refer to the Tang Stamp Chart provided by the company. The Tang Stamp Chart is a guide to the various markings found on the blade tangs of Schrade knives, and can be used to identify the year and month of production.

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The Tang Stamp Chart is divided into two columns, one representing the year of production and the other representing the month of production. Each column features a series of cryptic symbols and letters that are used to denote the year and month of production. The symbols used in the year column include three-letter codes, such as “FIS” for 1963 and “FIF” for 1964, while the symbols used in the month column are more familiar, such as “S” for September, “O” for October, and “N” for November.

Using the Tang Stamp Chart, a collector can determine the age of a Schrade knife by examining the markings on the blade tang and comparing them with the symbols listed in the chart. For example, if the blade tang of a Schrade knife bears the markings “FIS” and “N”, it would indicate that the knife was manufactured in 1963 during the month of November.

The Tang Stamp Chart is a useful tool for collectors of Schrade knives, as it helps them to accurately identify the age of their knives. It is important to remember, however, that the Tang Stamp Chart only applies to knives made after 1945, and does not apply to any knives made prior to that date. Therefore, if a collector needs to identify the age of a Schrade knife made before 1945, they may need to seek out additional resources or consult an expert in the field.

Schrade tang stamp variations

Schrade tang stamps are one of the most important pieces of information to consider when attempting to identify a Schrade knife. The various variations of tang stamps that can be found on Schrade knives can help determine the age and origin of the knife, as well as the model and series. The first step to decoding the tang stamp is to identify the type of the stamp. The most commonly seen Schrade tang stamps are an oval with the word ‘Schrade’ in the center, a circle with the word ‘Schrade’ in the center, and a rectangle with the word ‘Schrade’ in the center. Once the type of stamp is identified, the next step is to determine the year of manufacture, which can be done by referencing the Schrade Tang Stamp Chart. This chart shows the various years of production and the corresponding tang stamps for each year. It is important to note that the tang stamps on Schrade knives can vary widely and some of the stamps are not included on the chart. Additionally, the chart does not provide a complete history of Schrade tang stamps, and the latest models may not be included on the chart.

Once the year of production has been determined, the next step is to identify the model and series. This can be done by looking at the letters or numbers that are printed on the tang stamp. The letters or numbers provide information about the model and series of the knife. For example, an ‘S’ followed by three numbers indicates a Schrade Old Timer series, while a ‘W’ followed by three numbers indicates a Schrade Uncle Henry series. Additionally, the letters and numbers can provide information about the features of the knife, such as the blade material and handle material.

The Schrade Tang Stamp Chart is an invaluable resource for anyone looking to identify a Schrade knife. By referencing the chart, it is possible to accurately determine the year of production, the model and series of the knife, and the features of the knife. This information can then be used to accurately assess the value of the knife and determine its authenticity.

Collecting schrade knives

Collecting Schrade Knives is a popular pastime among knife enthusiasts. Unlike many other brands of knives, Schrade knives are easily identifiable and traceable due to their distinctive tang stamps. Tang stamps are imprinted onto the blade of the knife and can provide information about the knife’s origin, year of manufacture, and other identifying characteristics. Thus, being able to decode a Schrade tang stamp is an important skill for a knife collector.

Schrade knives initially began production in 1904 and used a variety of different tang stamp designs and markings. Over the years, the various designs and markings evolved to reflect changes in ownership and production. For example, after Schrade Cutlery Company merged with the Ulster Knife Company in 1946, the tang stamps changed to incorporate the Ulster Shield. In addition, beginning in 1959, the tang stamps also began to include a date code that allowed the knife’s year of manufacture to be easily identified.

Today, many Schrade tang stamps are easily identifiable and can provide a great deal of information about the knife. The tang stamps include information about the knife’s manufacturer, such as the Schrade logo, as well as the logo of the Ulster Knife Company. They also include a date code that can be used to identify the year of manufacture. In addition, the tang stamps may include symbols that indicate the type of steel used in the knife’s construction, as well as other identifying information.

By using a Schrade Tang Stamp Chart, knife collectors can easily decode the tang stamps on Schrade Knives, allowing them to accurately identify the year of manufacture and other important information. This makes it easier to properly identify and value a Schrade knife, which is an important part of a knife collector’s skill set. With the help of a Schrade Tang Stamp Chart, knife enthusiasts can easily identify Schrade knives and add to their collection.

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Schrade knife patterns

Schrade knives have been around since 1904, and they have a rich history of craftsmanship and quality. These blades are known for their durability and reliability, making them a favorite among outdoorsmen, hunters, and collectors. One of the most interesting aspects of Schrade knives is their tang stamps, which can help identify the pattern, age, and origin of the blade. By decoding the tang stamps, it is possible to learn a great deal about the knife, including its lineage and production run.

The tang stamp is the mark on the back of the blade that gives information about the knife. It usually consists of a combination of letters and numbers, and can include symbols and words. The early Schrade knives had a simple tang stamp, usually containing the name of the knife, or the Schrade logo. In the 1950s, Schrade started to use a more complex tang stamp, which included information such as the pattern name, the year of manufacture, and the origin of the blade. This tang stamp system is still used today, and it provides a wealth of information about the knife.

The Schrade tang stamp chart is an invaluable tool for decoding the marks on Schrade knives. The chart contains a list of all the tang stamps used by Schrade, as well as their associated pattern, year of manufacture, and origin. The chart also includes notes about Schrade’s production runs and patterns, which can help collectors and knife enthusiasts determine the age and origin of a particular knife.

Using the Schrade tang stamp chart, it is possible to learn a great deal about the knife. With the help of this chart, collectors and knife enthusiasts can determine the pattern, year of manufacture, and origin of their beloved Schrade knives. This information can be invaluable for anyone looking to buy or sell a Schrade knife, as it can give them a better understanding of the knife’s history and value. The Schrade tang stamp chart is a great resource for anyone looking to decode the marks on their Schrade knives.

Schrade knife values and grading

Schrade knives are highly valued by collectors and enthusiasts for their quality materials and craftsmanship. The tang stamp on a Schrade knife is the primary indicator of its value and grade. It features a series of characters and numbers that can be used to determine when and where the knife was made, as well as its original manufacturer. By understanding the different markings on a Schrade knife, it is possible to calculate its approximate value and grade.

The first two characters of a Schrade tang stamp indicate the manufacturer. For example, the “UH” stamp indicates that the knife was made by the Ulster Knife Company, which operated from the late 1800s to the mid-1900s. The “OT” stamp indicates that the knife was made by the Ontario Knife Company, which was founded in 1889. The “IM” stamp indicates that the knife was made by Imperial Schrade, which was founded in 1904.

The third character of the Schrade tang stamp is a letter that indicates the year the knife was manufactured. For example, the letter “A” indicates that the knife was made in 1940, while the letter “P” indicates that the knife was made in 1965. The fourth character is a number that indicates the blade pattern, such as a “3” for a drop point or a “6” for a clip point.

The final character of the Schrade tang stamp is the most important when it comes to calculating value and grade. This character is a letter that indicates the grade of the knife. For example, the letter “A” indicates a higher-grade knife, while the letter “D” indicates a lower-grade knife. Generally speaking, higher-grade knives are more valuable than lower-grade knives.

By decoding the Schrade tang stamp, it is possible to accurately determine the approximate value and grade of a Schrade knife. This knowledge can be used by collectors to determine the worth of a particular knife, as well as by enthusiasts to ensure they are purchasing a quality product.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the Schrade Tang Stamp Chart is an invaluable resource when it comes to decoding the marks on Schrade knives. The chart offers detailed information about the different types of stamps found on Schrade knives, helping knife collectors and enthusiasts to identify and appreciate the history of their Schrade knives. With the help of the Schrade Tang Stamp Chart, collectors can easily identify and date their knives, allowing them to better enjoy their knives and have a better understanding of their value.

Frequently asked questions:

What does a schrade tang stamp indicate?

A Schrade tang stamp indicates the type of steel used in the knife, as well as the country of origin and the year the knife was made. It can also indicate whether the knife was made in the United States or in Germany.

How can i identify a schrade knife?

You can identify a Schrade knife by looking for a tang stamp on the bottom of the blade. This stamp will indicate the type of steel used, the country of origin, and the year the knife was made.

What is the schrade stamp code for knives made in germany?

Knives made in Germany have a tang stamp code of ‘GER’ followed by a two digit year code. For example, a knife made in Germany in 2020 would have a tang stamp of ‘GER20’.